Murder By Vote

Murder By Vote

In Book 3, Penrose & Pyke are flung into an explosive new mystery during the campaign for women’s suffrage.

Politicians are terrified that women voters will oust them, liquor barons are furious that women favour temperance over drunkenness, and many factions fear their womenfolk will no longer be content with home and hearth.

Just how far will they go to stop women from getting the vote? Medical student Grace Penrose and Detective Constable Charlie Pyke are about to find out.

The ‘Penrose & Pyke Mysteries’ are a series of heart-warming, pulse-racing historical mysteries, set during a remarkable period of social upheaval in 1890s New Zealand. The fight for women’s rights has never been such deadly fun.

Pre-order Now – To Be Released 20 FEBRUARY 2023

Reader Reviews

Inspiration

Murder By Vote is set during the campaign for women’s suffrage in New Zealand in 1892.

The real campaign was fought via meetings, pamphlets and, most notably, by petitions. The petitions collected an astounding number of signatures, proving beyond a shadow of a doubt to the politicians of the day that women wanted the vote.

Here’s a photo of the main petition from 1893 (Source: National Library).

Almost a quarter of New Zealand women signed, an extraordinary achievement and a powerful testament to the door-knocking, speech-giving dedication of a band of determined campaigners.

Needless to say, in the fictional story of Murder By Vote, the suffrage campaign takes a far more dramatic turn, led by the various factions who wanted to stop women getting the vote, at any cost.

Here’s a sample of the anti-suffrage feeling they faced. (Photo taken at Ferrymead Heritage Park, https://ferrymead.org.nz/).

One look at this makes me want to empty those slops right over Mr Wright’s head!

The liquor industry was a strong opponent of votes for women, as the women’s campaign was aligned with temperance and prohibition of alcohol.

New Zealand was awash with booze at the time, causing huge damage to families and society. Their champion in Parliament was the wonderfully named Henry Fish.

The poster shown here is from the 1911 election (Source: National Library).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Website Built with WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: